Why no evidence of medical Cannabis efficiency exists?

Studies have been poorly designed — the evidence is unexplored

Joy Ride

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Photo by Science in HD on Unsplash

Canada legalized Cannabis in October 2018. Health Canada issued a very detailed 266-pages report addressed to Health Care professionals to summarize all the knowns and unknowns of medical and recreational Cannabis consumption for general population.

Medical Cannabis is legal in Canada since 2001, almost twenty years later health care professionals opposed to prescribe or recommend medical cannabis for treating health conditions. Why? Because no studies have confirmed the so-called anecdotal reports. Anecdotal evidence is distinctly different from scientific evidence. Anecdotal reports are not taken seriously by MDs; the medical community requires randomized clinical studies. Otherwise, it’s more like a rumor to doctors, not a shred of real evidence. However, many health professionals are mindful of the existence of anecdotal evidence; the so-called “stories” get published in well-respected medical journals.

Based on anecdotal reports or preclinical studies or animal studies or observational studies or small non-randomized studies, the medical community hypothesizes that medical Cannabis may be useful in approximately 50 common human conditions. Conditions are from devastating Alzheimer’s disease to simple insomnia. ( I wish I knew that when my amazing father was suffering from the quick onset of Alzheimer-like dementia at a relatively young age of 70).

Cannabis is not a medical treatment until Health authorities assign a drug identification number (DIN). Not until the future drug candidate has well-controlled and reproducible properties. And we are back to “a randomized clinical study.” An investigational therapy must succeed in the trial before it becomes a drug with DIN. The experimental drug candidate ideally should be tested…

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Joy Ride

Learner, writer, biotech investor, research translation, drug development, genetics. 4-lingual.